Daily Archives: February 19, 2010

DayBreak Fiction: “A Thousand Trains Out of Here”, v2

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A Thousand Trains Out of Here

Paul Evanby

Hey: I’m both happy and proud to present a Dutch writer — a compatriot — on this (supposedly) international stage. I think it’s healthy that English-language SF is increasingly (even if still somewhat slowly) opening up to non-Anglophone writers. In general, I think greater diversity is a good thing.

Atypically, Paul is not among the modern creed of speculative fiction writers who keep the day job for financial security and write for pleasure or for the soul (or both) in their spare time: no, he quit his job to get more writing done. Then — as he told me at the last semi-irregular meet-ups we have with Jurgen Snoeren and Floris Kleijne — his previous employer(s) kept bothering him with requests to work on several IT projects (obviously, his expertise is in demand, and I’m trying to use it for make an iPhone app. of his own story).

No rest for the wicked, as the saying goes.

A saying that is perfectly applicable to “A Thousand Trains Out of Here”, where Jaouad — the main character — tries, very hard, to get at least one certain aspect of his overworked (yet fairly exciting) life in order. To use another saying: should you ‘be careful what you wish for’, or not?

There was always the sudden brightness in their eyes: the lighting up of their faces which was actually, Jaouad thought, a kind of hidden, inverted form of racism. Racism, and thus self-hatred. But they were never aware. How could they be? Moroccan-targeted xenophobia was simply not done. Not in the Netherlands: one does not, after all, bite the hand that feeds.

The blonde girl behind the counter smiled at him as he waved his hand in front of the credit reader. No careful positioning of his fingers over the sensor for him: his implants were always first-class, and registered immediately.

The girl noticed it too, of course, and her starry-eyed “Enjoy your lunch” sounded that much more breathless for it. Continue reading

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DayBreak Fiction: “A Thousand Trains Out of Here”

Share/BookmarkDownload files of the story:Download PDF version of the story!Download WORD version of the story!

A Thousand Trains Out of Here

Paul Evanby

Hey: I’m both happy and proud to present a Dutch writer — a compatriot — on this (supposedly) international stage. I think it’s healthy that English-language SF is increasingly (even if still somewhat slowly) opening up to non-Anglophone writers. In general, I think greater diversity is a good thing.

Atypically, Paul is not among the modern creed of speculative fiction writers who keep the day job for financial security and write for pleasure or for the soul (or both) in their spare time: no, he quit his job to get more writing done. Then — as he told me at the last semi-irregular meet-ups we have with Jurgen Snoeren and Floris Kleijne — his previous employer(s) kept bothering him with requests to work on several IT projects (obviously, his expertise is in demand, and I’m trying to use it for make an iPhone app. of his own story).

No rest for the wicked, as the saying goes.

A saying that is perfectly applicable to “A Thousand Trains Out of Here”, where Jaouad — the main character — tries, very hard, to get at least one certain aspect of his overworked (yet fairly exciting) life in order. To use another saying: should you ‘be careful what you wish for’, or not?

There was always the sudden brightness in their eyes: the lighting up of their faces which was actually, Jaouad thought, a kind of hidden, inverted form of racism. Racism, and thus self-hatred. But they were never aware. How could they be? Moroccan-targeted xenophobia was simply not done. Not in the Netherlands: one does not, after all, bite the hand that feeds.

The blonde girl behind the counter smiled at him as he waved his hand in front of the credit reader. No careful positioning of his fingers over the sensor for him: his implants were always first-class, and registered immediately.

The girl noticed it too, of course, and her starry-eyed “Enjoy your lunch” sounded that much more breathless for it. Continue reading

December @outshine prose poems—Inspiring

December 2:

The jay didn’t smile as he stole the seed.
The woman didn’t perceive his grief until she had cast the stone.
Her regret would heal the rift.

[Bio] Jodi: I don’t know who she is except lost in her thoughts and found in her writing.

December 9:

He became an artist, sculpting electron shells into elements across the periodic table, converting concrete suburbs to jeweled dreamscapes.

[Bio] @MattAlbertson is a Seattle geek who enjoys splicing his fiction with cutting edge technology. http://www.mattalbertson.com/ .

December 16:

Over his brutish shoulder I got a glimpse of her tortured face as he hauled Liberty into the darkness. “I’ll be back,” she mouthed to me.

[Bio] Susan is a freelance writer and children’s playwright from upstate New York.

December 23:

quaking aspen:
myriad blinking eyes
witness the dawn

[Bio] When she’s not chasing her kids or writing about science, Julie Bloss Kelsey enjoys staring at trees. Visit her online @MamaJoules .

December 30:

Taking recycled cargo boxes through clouds
up the well-worn space elevator’s heights
foam swords, deodorant, and I grow warm.

[Bio] K.M. Praschak writes & sometimes looks up at http://is.gd/4Woub- .